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Cosmetology
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  Cosmetology
The Cosmetology diploma program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for careers in the field of cosmetology. Learning opportunities develop academic and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes specialized training in safety, sanitation, state laws, rules, and regulations, chemistry, anatomy and physiology, skin, hair, and nail diseases and disorders, hair treatments and manipulations, hair shaping, hair styling, artificial hair, braiding/intertwining hair, chemical reformation and application, skin and nail care, hair coloring, hair lightening, reception, sales, management, math, reading, writing, interpersonal relations development, computer skills, employability skills, and work ethics. The curriculum meets state licensing requirements of the State Board of Cosmetology.

Program Completion

Students admitted into the Cosmetology program must complete all courses within five(5) years of admittance into the program. Those who fail to complete within the time limit must repeat all cosmetology courses.
Please Note: Once a student enters the Cosmetology program on one campus, they must take all their courses on that campus, and online courses offered through their instructors.

Shampoo Technician

The Shampoo Technician Technical Certificate of Credit introduces courses that prepare students for careers in the field of Cosmetology as Shampoo Technicians. Learning opportunities develop academic and professional knowledge required for job acquisition, retention and advancement. The program emphasizes specialized training for safety, sanitation, state laws, rules and regulations, chemistry, anatomy and physiology, skin, hair, hair treatments and manipulations, as well as theory of hair styling, artificial hair, braiding/intertwining hair, reception sales, management, employability skills, and work ethics.

Minimum Grade Requirement:

The Georgia State Board of Cosmetology requires a minimum grade of C in all COSM (Cosmetology) courses.
 
Program Requirements  
 
 

Sample Graduation Plans
 
 
 
 
Frequently Asked Questions

How old do I have to be to take the State Board examinations?

You must be 17 years of age.


How many hours do I need in order to graduate?

You will need to complete 1,500 hours.


When can I start the program?

Dawson Campus:

Students are admitted into the Cosmetology program to take their core classes any semester. The Cosmetology courses are scheduled to start for evening program Summer 2015 and Spring 2016. The day Cosmetology courses are scheduled to start Fall of 2015 and Summer of 2016. Space is limited to 15 students for day and evening programs. Registration is on a first come first serve availability. If you have any questions please contact one of the Dawsonville advisors:

Angelia Brown at 678-513-5204 or email at abrown2@laniertech.edu.
Jayna Durden at 678-513-5206 or email at jdurden@laniertech.edu

Oakwood Campus:

Students are admitted into the Cosmetology program to take their core classes any semester. The Cosmetology courses are scheduled to start for evening program Summer 2015 and Spring 2016. The day Cosmetology courses are scheduled to start Fall of 2015 and Summer of 2016. Space is limited to 20 students for day and evening programs. Registration is on a first come first serve availability. If you have any questions please contact one of the Oakwood advisors:

Jacqueline Mann at 770-533-6950 or email at jmann1@laniertech.edu
Octavia Burns at 770-533-6977 or email at oburns@laniertech.edu
Joy Dyer at 770-533-6984 or email at jdyer@laniertech.edu



Additional Information on the
Cosmetology Program

Click (+) on the following topics for more information:
Significant Points [+]

  • Employment is expected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations.
  • A State license is required for cosmetologists and most other personal appearance workers, although qualifications vary by State.
  • About 44 percent of workers are self employed; many also work flexible schedules.



  • Program Instructors [+]

      Angelia Brown  
      Cosmetology Instructor
      Dawson Campus
      abrown2@laniertech.edu
      Phone: (678) 513-5204


      Octavia Burns  
      Cosmetology Instructor
      Oakwood Campus
      oburns@laniertech.edu
      Phone: (770) 533-6977


      Jayna Durden  
      Cosmetology Instructor
      Dawson Campus
      jdurden@laniertech.edu
      Phone: (678) 513-5206


      Joy Dyer  
      Cosmetology Instructor
      Oakwood Campus
      jdyer@laniertech.edu
      Phone: (770) 533-6984


      Jacqueline Mann  
      Cosmetology Instructor
      Oakwood Campus
      jmann1@laniertech.edu
      Phone: (770) 533-6950


      Shana Adams  Adjunct Instructor
      Adjunct Cosmetology Instructor
      Dawson Campus
      sadams@laniertech.edu
      Phone: na


      Jessica Duff  Adjunct Instructor
      Cosmetology
      Dawson Campus
      jduff@laniertech.edu
      Phone: na


      Julia Hart  Adjunct Instructor
      Cosmetology
      Oakwood Campus
      jhart@laniertech.edu
      Phone: na


      Zoanne McKinstry  Adjunct Instructor
      Cosmetology
      Oakwood Campus
      zmckinstry@laniertech.edi
      Phone: na


      Wilma Smith  Adjunct Instructor
      Cosmetology
      Dawson Campus
      wsmith@laniertech.edu
      Phone: na





    Nature of the Work [+]

    Cosmetologists focus on providing hair care services to enhance the appearance of customers. Other personal appearance workers, such as manicurists and pedicurists, shampooers, and skin care specialists, provide specialized beauty services that help clients look and feel their best.

    Hairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologists offer a wide range of beauty services, such as shampooing, cutting, coloring, and styling of hair. They may advise clients on how to care for their hair at home. In addition, cosmetologists may be trained to give manicures, pedicures, and scalp and facial treatments; provide makeup analysis; and clean and style wigs and hairpieces.

    A number of workers offer specialized services. Manicurists and pedicurists, called nail technicians in some States, work exclusively on nails and provide manicures, pedicures, polishing, and nail extensions to clients. Another group of specialists is skin care specialists, or estheticians, who cleanse and beautify the skin by giving facials, full-body treatments, and head and neck massages, as well as apply makeup. They also may remove hair through waxing or, if properly trained, with laser treatments. Finally, in larger salons, shampooers specialize in shampooing and conditioning hair.

    In addition to working with clients, personal appearance workers may keep records of hair color or skin care regimens used by their regular clients. A growing number actively sell hair, skin, and nail care products. Cosmetologists and other personal appearance workers who operate their own salons have managerial duties that may include hiring, supervising, and firing workers, as well as keeping business and inventory records, ordering supplies, and arranging for advertising.




    Work Environment [+]

    Many full-time cosmetologists, and other personal appearance workers put in a 40-hour week, but longer hours are common, especially among self-employed workers. Work schedules may include evenings and weekends, the times when beauty salons are busiest. Many workers, especially those who are self-employed, determine their own schedules. In 2008, about 29 percent of hairstylists and cosmetologists worked part time, and 14 percent had variable schedules.

    Cosmetologists and other personal appearance workers usually work in clean, pleasant surroundings with good lighting and ventilation. Most work in a salon, although some may work in a spa, hotel, or resort. Good health and stamina are important, because these workers are on their feet for most of their shift. Prolonged exposure to some hair and nail chemicals may cause irritation, so protective clothing, such as plastic gloves or aprons, may be worn.




    Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement [+]

    Education and training. A high school diploma or GED is required for some personal appearance workers in some States. In addition, most States require that cosmetologists complete a program in a State-licensed cosmetology school. Programs in hairstyling, skin care, and other personal appearance services can be found in both high schools and in public or private technical schools.

    Full-time programs in cosmetology usually last 9 months or more and may lead to an associate degree, but training for manicurists and pedicurists and skin care specialists requires significantly less time. Shampooers generally do not need formal training. Most professionals take advanced courses in hairstyling or other personal appearance services to keep up with the latest trends. They also may take courses in sales and marketing.

    Licensure. All States require cosmetologists and other personal appearance workers to be licensed, with the exception of shampooers. Qualifications for a license vary by State, but generally a person must have a high school diploma or GED, be at least 16 years old, and have graduated from a State-licensed cosmetology school. After graduating from a State approved training program, students take a State licensing examination. The exam consists of a written test and, in some cases, a practical test of styling skills or an oral examination. Most States require separate licensing examinations for manicurists, pedicurists, and skin care specialists. A fee is usually required upon application for a license, and periodic license renewals may be necessary.

    Some States have reciprocity agreements that allow licensed cosmetologists to obtain a license in another State without additional formal training, but such agreements are uncommon. Consequently, persons who wish to work in a particular State should review the laws of that State before entering a training program.



    Other qualifications. Successful personal appearance workers should have an understanding of fashion, art, and technical design. They also must keep a neat personal appearance and a clean work area. Interpersonal skills, image, and attitude play an important role in career success. As client retention and retail sales become an increasingly important part of salons' revenue, the ability to be an effective salesperson becomes ever more vital for salon workers. Some cosmetology schools consider “people skills” to be such an integral part of the job that they require coursework in that area. Business skills are important for those who plan to operate their own salons.



    Certification and advancement. Advancement usually takes the form of higher earnings, as cosmetologists gain experience and build a steady clientele. Some cosmetologists manage salons, lease booth space in salons, or open their own salons after several years of experience. Others teach in cosmetology schools or provide training through technical schools. Still others advance to other related occupations, such as sales representatives for companies that sell salon-related products, image or fashion consultants, or examiners for State licensing boards.




    Job Outlook [+]

    Overall employment of cosmetologists and other personal appearance workers is projected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations. Opportunities for entry-level workers should be favorable, while job candidates at high-end establishments will face keen competition.

    Job opportunities generally should be good, particularly for licensed personal appearance workers seeking entry-level positions. A large number of job openings will come about from the need to replace workers who transfer to other occupations, retire, or leave the labor force for other reasons. However, workers can expect keen competition for jobs and clients at higher paying salons, as these positions are relatively few and require applicants to compete with a large pool of licensed and experienced cosmetologists. Opportunities will generally be best for those with previous experience and for those licensed to provide a broad range of services.



    Employment change. Personal appearance workers will grow by 20 percent from 2008 to 2018, which is much faster than the average for all occupations.

    Employment trends are expected to vary among the different occupational specialties. Employment of hairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologists will increase by about 20 percent, much faster than average. This growth will primarily come from an increasing population, which will lead to greater demand for basic hair services. Additionally, the demand for hair coloring and other advanced hair treatments has increased in recent years, particularly among baby boomers and young people. This trend is expected to continue, leading to a favorable outlook for hairdressers, hairstylists, and cosmetologists.

    Continued growth in the number full-service spas and nail salons will also generate numerous job openings for manicurists, pedicurists, and skin care specialists. Estheticians and other skin care specialists will see large gains in employment, and are expected to grow almost 38 percent, much faster than average, primarily due to the popularity of skin treatments for relaxation and medical well-being. Manicurists and pedicurists meanwhile will grow by 19 percent, faster than average.



       
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    2990 Landrum Education Drive, Oakwood, Georgia 30566
    Phone: 770-533-7000 | Fax: 770-531-6328
    A Unit of the Technical College System of Georgia
    An Equal Opportunity Institution.